Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI By Matt Allington

Active learning lessons for mastering DAX

Data analysis expressions (DAX) is the formula language of PowerPivot and this book is written to give hands on practice to anyone who wants to become competent at writing such formulas. Sample exercises that explain each concept are provided and followed by practice questions and answers to maximize learning and experience with DAX. Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI

This is a great book for those getting started with PowerPivot. I am a long time Excel user, and am pretty good with Excel Formulas, following along with the exercises in this book it really helped me bridge my knowledge from Excel Formulas over the DAX. This book provides great visuals, explanations, and the exercises concrete what you are learning. The sample database along with the exercises created a resource I will use going forward when I am solving real problems/writing formulas for my PowerPivot reports for work. Excellent resource, and well worth the money! Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI I've bought a few other market leading DAX books and this one is far structured with proper worked examples. It would be good if there was a follow up on Excel Power Query and Power BI. Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI For those new to DAX, this is the perfect introduction. By the end of reading, if you make sure you complete all the exercises and fully understand what's going on, you'll be pretty competent at writing basic to intermediate level DAX. The author recommends reading this book at the same time as Rob Collie's Power Pivot and Power BI book. That's exactly what I did and it was a winning combination. Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI I ordered the Kindle version of this, as I was keen to get started on completing the exercises, and didn't want to have to wait for the (considerably expensive) print edition. In principle. the book is exactly what I wanted. I have been learning DAX via Rob Collie's excellent book which is recommended in this book too, but wanted to get some practical experience, rather than just reading the theory.
The writing style of the book is great it's easy to read and understand (particularly if you have other books such as the book by Rob mentioned above). I'm disappointed to say that the book hasn't so far lived up to my expectations.
The book is designed for users of Excel 2013, and one of the first exercises will not work in Excel 2016. This thankfully doesn't prevent the user from completing the DAX written exercises, but buyers should beware that the book isn't a perfect match for all versions of Excel. It was only after visiting Matt Allington's forum which provides support for the book (a nice idea, and in this case much needed), that I found out about the difference between Excel 2013 and Excel 2016.
Regrettably, I have to say that upon completing the first set of written exercises for the SUM function in chapter 4, when I checked the answers against those in the Appendix, my versions were different. The naming conventions for the fields do not match those in the sample database used. This really should have been checked thoroughly before the book was put into production. If there are flaws so early in the book, how on earth can users be sure whether they are doing things the right way when we move on to complex topics.
I hope that the next version of the book due out mid 2018 is thoroughly checked before it is released.
Apologies to Matt for the poor review. I really wanted to give this a glowing review as the book should perfectly fit my needs, but my experiences of it so far have left me wondering whether it's worth continuing through the rest of the chapters, or will I find errors and problems? Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI This is a must have. It may not be as in depth as other books, but Matt uses a way of teaching which I am very found of and can't really find with other authors: by examples. Small, one thing changing type of exercises to cement what you've just learnt in the previous chapter. I can't recommend this enough!! Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI

Summary Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI

This is the book to start with if you are beginning your DAX writing journey. In my opinion, Matt's approach to helping people learn how to write DAX is superior to any of the other DAX books I have read. He introduces a topic/concept in small pieces, explains it, then immediately provides practice exercises to reinforce the material. This is the BEST way to learn: by attempting to write the DAX code, and seeing if you understood it by looking at the results. The pace is just right, so the amount of material you need to conquer is attainable.

Matt also explained some topics in a way that I had not seen previously, but found eye opening. It filled in several gaps in my understanding, and answered lingering questions I had. I think he just gets it when it comes to teaching, and explains things in a way that is exactly what I was looking for. His chapter on the FILTER function was exceptional, and it reads like he is giving you a personal tutoring session.

If you are a beginner, this book is for you. Even if you have read other DAX books, and have some experience writing DAX, I want to encourage you to get this book. It will help crystallize the material you already know, and give you some new insights into what is going on with DAX. It certainly did for me.

I also want to encourage the author, Matt Allington, to consider writing another book on DAX. He is a superb teacher, and hit a grand slam on this one! Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI First Matt is always extremely helpful on one of the forums I pose questions to. He is extremely knowledgable on these cutting edge analysis tools in Excel. More importantly, it is GREAT to see an author who poses questions for you to solve and then reviews answers. Too often books are follow me with dumps of exercises, followed by the reader having no idea how to apply. Authors of Excel books (and programming books in general) should take notes. I don't want books that just give me a dump of everything YOU know, I'd like some challenge problems with possible solutions so I can better assimilate and synthesize the knowledge! Thanks for taking the time to do that Matt. Great book if you want to learn about DAX! Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI Learn to Write DAX! This book is well written. In fact, any and all of Matt Allington's books are excellent guides into the mysteries of DAX. As I write this review, in fact, I look down at my desk to see Supercharge Power BI within easy reach. Getting my head wrapped around DAX has been a journey. My copy of Learn to Write DAX is likewise, often referred to. It is well dog eared and the margins are full of notes.

I love both of these books on DAX. Both are rich with content. DAX is not a subject I could grasp with one reading of either book. As I build data models with Power BI and Power Pivot, I write yet another DAX formula and think something is going to work only to find myself wondering where did I go wrong? Having constructive guidance to walk you through DAX concepts and constructs is essential to advancing one's skills to grasp this subject. I am grateful to Matt Allington for sharing this knowledge.

I am grateful for these guides and to Matt's dedication to passing on this knowledge. Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI When I purchased this book, I assumed that since there were two main subjects on the cover,
that the book would be split between DAX on PowerPivot and DAX on PowerBI.
This book does not cover POWERBI. The information for PowerBI is very basic and can be found on free sites.
2nd. This book is riddled with mistakes. The author starts a calculation, then never finishes it.
Then, in subsequent pages, you are struggling to find where the calcuation was completednever was.
Very informative for DAX. Not informative for PowerBI. Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI I've read many well written computer books in my career, but, Learn to Write DAX, by Matt Allington, truly stands out. Not satisfied to merely instruct, Matt evinces a serious interest in the reader's success at mastering the subject. He keeps the lessons enjoyable, yet moves along at a snappy pace. A virtual course in DAX, the author engages the reader while presenting new material, which he sprinkles with practical pointers and encouragement.

The book is intended to serve as an introduction to the topic. You will not be a DAX expert upon completion of this book, however, you will have a very solid grounding to build on.

Matt Allington deliberately designed his book so that it doesn't permit passive reading. He keeps referring back to, and reuses old bits and exercises that you had better have completed. These exercises aren't just an added feature, Matt uses them as building blocks of the reader's learning process. He persistently demands that you think about what you've learned, actually use it, and reinforce what's already been covered. If you follow the instructions, while completing all the exercises, you cannot get lost.

I highly recommend this book, not only to people wanting to learn DAX, but, to other authors of computer books, as a model of excellent presentation. Learn to Write DAX: A practical guide to learning Power Pivot for Excel and Power BI

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