Don Alvaro, or the Force of Fate (1835): A Play by Angel De Saavedra, Duke of Rivas By Angel De Saavedra Duke of Rivas

.savingPriceOverride { color:#CC0C39!important; font weight: 300!important; }.reinventMobileHeaderPrice { font weight: 400; } #apex_offerDisplay_mobile_feature_div.reinventPriceSavingsPercentageMargin, #apex_offerDisplay_mobile_feature_div.reinventPricePriceToPayMargin { margin right: 4px; } 12 % 28,21€28,21€ Don Alvaro, or the Force of Fate (1835): A Play by Angel De Saavedra, Duke of Rivas

Summary ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ´ Angel De Saavedra Duke of Rivas

As an enthusiastic collector of operatic sources, I can't recommend this play highly enough, its operatic counterpart (in both the original and revised versions) being one of my favourite Verdi compositions. LA FORZA DEL DESTINO is a close adaptation of its source play, except for the fact that Rivas's Leonor (Leonora in the opera) has two brothers, who become one the opera, as well as the different less tragic 1869 ending (some minor characters are discarded in Verdi). The only snag is that Fedorchek has opted for an entirely prose translation for the sake of the contemporary audience, who might find verse a foreign theatrical medium. An unfairly undervalued work. Don Alvaro, or the Force of Fate (1835): A Play by Angel De Saavedra, Duke of Rivas A very interesting read for fans of Verdi's La Forza del Destino. One of the sources with Schiller's Wallensteins Lager for the opera which, especially in its first version, remained very close to this play. Don Alvaro, or the Force of Fate (1835): A Play by Angel De Saavedra, Duke of Rivas De Saavedra's Don Alvaro should be much, much famed in world literature far beyond its impact on Spanish drama, this high strung drama is truly Shakespearean in its intensity, ambiguity, and depiction of noble and common characters. None of the characters are as others see them and none are even as they believe themselves to be. The characters, the actions, even fate seem to be complex, fragmented, and anguishedly uncertain. The music, the action, the movement all are modern, rollicking, intriguing than that in many an English drama. This would be a great play for college and even high school production, one which would doubtlessly force quite different and perhaps serious discussion than the ever popular but somewhat ridiculous Romeo and Juliet on such issues as class, race, honor killing, religious asceticism, and war. I would love to see this presented at the Shakespeare Theatre in nearby Washington, DC!! Don Alvaro, or the Force of Fate (1835): A Play by Angel De Saavedra, Duke of Rivas

Don